Spain for food lovers

Posted on 20 December 2017

While there are a number of reasons why people chose to migrate to Spain, you will often find that one of the highest on the list is the food. Tapas, paella, chorizo… the list of foods that Spanish is famous for is long and varied. But where can you find that one dish you really want – and what else is there for you in those areas?

Surf and turf in Alicante

Alicante has recently begun garnering an international reputation for its culinary scene, and there are a diverse range of cuisines to chose from here. There is the Mediterranean seafood and superb fish markets nearby, as well as the roasted meats and stews from the nearby mountains, and of course the Catalan influences from the north of the region.

Alicante is one of the most popular towns with expats in Spain, partly because it is much less expensive than the larger urban towns of Madrid and Barcelona – both in terms of house prices and the cost of living there.

Cooking a giant paella in Valencia (ELEPHOTOS /

Casual tapas in Seville

There are a number of stories that describe the origins of tapas, but one myth is that it began at a farmer’s bar in Seville. When serving beer or sherry, they would place a saucer on top to keep the flies out – before realising that they could serve a little ham, olives and/or cheese on the top. Now there are many tapas restaurants across Seville, where you can enjoy calamares, patatas bravas, alioli, croquetas and much more.

Seville is vibrant and colourful town, with much to offer expats. It offers a slower pace of life than many other expat-focussed places in Spain, and many assert that it is the most romantic city in th country. Property here is relatively cheap and the housing market more accessible – especially compared to what you may be used to in the UK.

Paella in Valencia

Paella is synonymous with Spain and this eastern town is widely known as its originator. Classically Spain’s most famous dish is a saffron tinged rice dish that comes with either seafood or chicken, and vegetables, but now it comes in many different varieties.

Valencia is a multicutural city, which also offers a lower cost of living than the larger towns of Madrid and Barcelona. As the third biggest city in Spain, it’s big enough to be a metropolis, but small enough that those moving here won’t feel immediately overwhelmed. With a large expat community, and accommodation is affordable.

Jamon Iberico in Caeceres

Caceres in Extremadura is famous as the home of the speciality dish, jamon iberico – as well as pimenton de la vera, and you can often find these combined in one dish in many restaurants throughout the area.

In addition to the gastronomy, there are a number of reasons why expats choose to settle in Caeceres. It’s an UNESCO World Heritage site, with both cultural and historical significance – meaning that there is much exploration to do in terms of architecture, and history. The wine here is also renowned, with its local offering pleasantly popular – working will with the town’s specialities.

When you’re ready to make the move, click here to download the Spain Buying Guide. It’s completely FREE and packed with great advice.

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